Skip to content

Recent Articles

11
Oct

NDC Sydney 2018: Bots – the Next UI Revolution

Advertisements
16
Oct

NDC Sydney 2017 – The Story of Azure with Scott Allen

27
Apr

Microsoft Azure Service Fabric with Daniel Toomey

19
Mar

NDC Sydney 2016 | Ask Me Anything! with Jason Brown & Fabien Ruffin (Continuous Delivery)

17
Mar

NDC Sydney 2016 | Ask Me Anything! with Gojko Adzic (Serverless Architectures)

16
Feb

Ignite 2017 – Conversation as a platform with Dr Neil

14
Sep

Angular 2 CLI – Port Hog

I’m running lots of Angular 2 using the CLI on OSX (and loving it).

I have one small issue…

Often after stopping the app, when re-running it I get

Port 4200 is already in use.

Here is a little linux magic for you:

lsof -t -i tcp:4200 | xargs kill -9 | ng serve

This will find the process using port 4200, kill it, then re-serve your application.

(Posted for my FireBootCamp students that are having this issue.)

5
Aug

NDC Sydney 2016 – Angular 2 War Stories

I was lucky enough to be asked to present at NDC Sydney – probably the best conference I have ever been to.

You can check out our session here.

Angular 2 War Stories – We’re bringing the front line to you !

Angular 2 is awesome. Performance, Mobile friendly, Flexible. Sweet ! Happy Users, Happy Developers, Happy Business. Awesome! …. but there are so many options, and so many unanswered questions.
This session will de-mystify Angular 2 and show you the pitfalls to avoid when building Angular 2 in production. Come see how we are doing it now on large enterprise applications.

21
Jan

ASP.NET 5 De-bamboozled – Lessons I wish some-one else had learned

 

http://tv.ssw.com/6628/asp-net-5-de-b… The change from ASP.NET 4 to ASP.NET 5 brings a whole lot of awesome to web development, but it’s the biggest change since MVC was introduced and the learning curve is massive.

SSW shipped 2 enterprise apps on ASP.NET 5 while it was still in Beta (wow, that hurt).

Don’t spend weeks trying to understand how to get your new project right.

This session isn’t just ‘hello world’, it’s the stuff we wish we’d known in those first head-scratching weeks.

30
Dec

Tips for Continuously Deploying to Azure via GitHub

Continuously deploying from GitHub to Azure should be easy. In this video I discuss 2 issues I found when deploying an API using ASP.Net 5

tl;dw

Here is what I was trying to do:

  • I had a simple ASP.Net 5 Web API project.
    For this demo, I just went file | New and chose the Web API Template for an ASP.Net 5 project
  • I checked it into GitHub
  • I went into Azure and created an API app (I could do the exact same demo using a  Web App)
  • Then I went in and configured continuous deployment in the Azure portal

It should have been simple…..

 

There are two issues:

#1: Even the most basic ASP.Net 5 project requires at least a B1 Azure instance size. For Free and Shared instances, there will be insufficient space for the build, even though they give you 1 GB of storage.

 

#2: If you want to successfully deploy an ASP.Net 5 project, even if it doesn’t require the wwwroot folder, you need to include it for Azure to recognise the project as an ASP.Net 5 project that needs to be deployed.

i.e. even for a pure web API project that serves no static content. If you don’t have a wwwroot folder the project won’t be published to Azure, the repo will just be pulled… then the app won’t run. (the project.json webroot setting appears to be ignored)

 

For the Microsoft Team:

  • #1: I would like to be able to create a simple ASP.Net 5 API or Web project and continuously deploy it to Azure via GitHub.. and have it work on the Free instance size.
    • I think it is important for developers interested in Azure to have the freedom to experiment without worrying about getting charged
    • This may involve expanding the size of the free tier on Azure, or maybe it means making some exceptions about what is counted towards the 1 gb of storage…. but we want a frictionless entry to continuous deployment of ASP.Net to Azure
  • #2 The second thing  I really  want to see  is a few more smarts around how we identify if an application is a .Net app and if it needs to be pulled straight into Azure from GitHub, or wether it needs to be compiled and published. It appears at the moment it is looking for the existence of a wwwroot folder to make the decision. Suggestion: should we be checking for the existence of a project.json or a hosting.json and then checking for the webroot setting to assist in this determination? similar to the work being done on default logic around the webroot https://github.com/aspnet/Announcements/issues/94

 

%d bloggers like this: